Manuals for Open Journal Systems

I have found that many editorial boards struggle with a lack of concise instruction materials and a lack of people who can train them with hands-on approach.  They usually find some solutions in on-line forums, but it is time consuming for editorial boards to spend so much time and look for partial information. Sometimes people who write manuals do not explain each step.  Several people contacted me and asked: “What I have to do now?  Something is missing.”

System administrators, software developers assume that what is easy to them it should be easy to everyone.  They plan training to be done in one evening because “It is easy. ” In my experience, I often found out that such practice leads to misconfiguration of application, underuse of its features,  mistakes in performing workflow tasks and procedures.  Work with applications as the Open Journal Systems is not hard but it is complex and it takes some time until user is familiar with its functionality and simple procedures for configuration and efficient use.

I wrote manuals for authors, editorial boards and reviewers for scientific journals according to their needs.

You can find here manual for authors, editorial boards, and reviewers.

I will publish here soon manual that puts together some basic administrative and editorial functions aimed to successful configuration of your Open Journal Systems application for your journal.

 

Advertisements

CrossRef, DOI, XML, easy to do?

Many people from editorial boards asked me various questions about registering their journal with CrossRef. What is DOI? Is that XML thing too complicated?  Do we need someone with PhD to do that?

CrossRef is a not-for-profit membership organization for scholarly publishing working to make content easy to find, cite, link, and assess. We do it in five ways: rallying the community; tagging metadata; running a shared infrastructure; playing with new technology; and making tools and services to improve research communications.  The Digital Object Identifier, DOI is special number assigned uniquely to publications such as article, issue, galley, dataset, book, database etc.  There is interesting Wikipedia article about DOI for those who do not have much time to go into details.

People from CrossRef created a series of training materials which you can find on their Youtube channel.

I found very useful to watch their training on content registration and maintaining metadata information.  You can find a lot of useful information in that video training.  If you prefer slide presentation CrossRef published on Slideshare presentation about the same topic.

I always suggest to those who do not want to spend a lot of time in technical work in process of metadatadeposit and xml formatting to use the Open Journal Systems.

It is very easy to use Open Journal Systems and assign DOI numbers. Easy to use interface and pretty automatized process of metadata deposit save you a lot of time and effort.   There is special plugin for DOI assignment to your articles or other article/publication components. The users of 2.4.x branch of OJS can find information on assigning DOIs here.

The users of 3.x branch of OJS can do that even easier in less than 2 minutes configuration of plugin.  Huh, you will see that DOI and XML exports are not so hard thing. After using OJS you can ask yourself why you have had a lot of anxiety while thinking on things that are so easy to do.